Audi A6 review – All you need to know

      

Audi hadn’t launched all-new models for a very long time, until the all-new A6 came along in 2019. However, there have been some updated and special edition launches in between, but those are far from being all-new. The only last launch before the new A6, was the Q5, back in 2018. The delay behind new model launches was the upgrading of its engine line-up whilst fighting the ‘Dieselgate’ scandal. All of this has an impact on markets all over the globe. Starting with the new A6, however, we’ve witnessed quite a number of launches like the Q2, A8 and Q8. Let’s see what the new A6 is capable of.

Those crisp lines

The Audi A6 we’ve got for our market is the standard-wheelbase model. Audi Cars have increased the dimensions, so it is longer, wider and taller. Even the wheelbase has been stretched that bit, but you’ll barely be able to notice. The overall silhouette is now sharper; it has a long bonnet, stubby boot and a curved glasshouse. The panels are nicely curved with the right amount of angular elements giving it a modern look. Audi’s new single-frame ‘Bulgarian Beard’ has grown larger and gives the car some width up-front. There’s a lot of chrome visible too. Flanked by the grille are the angular, full-LED headlights, featuring a new DRL signature. At the rear, you are reminded of older A6s, but the LED tail lights are bigger with a chrome strip running in between. Chrome detailing can be found on the rear bumper as well, including the dual exhaust tips. If sharp creases are your thing, the Audi A6 has plenty all over. We particularly love the 18-inch wheels on this one too.

Luxury inside

The cabin of the new Audi A6 is perhaps among the most modern we’ve seen. The dashboard consists of layers, a slab that juts out, made of open-pore wood veneer, art leather, piano black trim and brushed aluminium. Even the doors sport brushed aluminium bits, giving it a top-quality, premium look. You also get a new steering that bodes rather well with the Virtual Cockpit behind it. Features include a wireless phone charger beneath the central armrest and a Bang & Olufsen hi-fi audio-system, the latter of which sounds excellent. There’s a dual-touchscreen MMI infotainment system; the graphics are good and the system works smoothly; it also gets functions like Android Auto and Apple CarPlay. The haptic feedback offered by Audi Cars in the A6, is great. Up-front, it gets powered seats, with the driver’s side offering a memory function. Upon turning the car off, the powered steering and seat move away from each other, giving you easy access from inside the car, and outside. Then there’s the hands-free parking assistant feature.

Now while some will love to be seen up-front, it’s the back seat that matters more in this segment. We can confirm that it is roomer than the older A6 and offers as much space as some of its other rivals. In the A6, you sit lower than you do in an A4, the backrest is a bit upright and there’s space for two full-grown adults at the back. The contoured seats provide lots of support and comfort. Occupants at the back also get manually-adjustable sun-blinds, four-zone climate control and a sunroof. At 530-litres of boot capacity, it offers just as much storage as its contenders.

Let’s torque

Under the hood, the new A6 (the 45 TFSI) gets a 2.0-litre, turbocharged, 4-cylinder petrol engine, with power being sent to the front wheels via a 7-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission. The engine produces 241bhp and 370Nm of torque. What impressed us instantly was the refinement; you can hardly hear anything at idle and while gradually picking up pace. Post 4000rpm however, you begin to hear the petrol engine. The S-Tronic ‘box shifts smoothly, which is perfect for everyday driving – and by and large – the powertrain never feels hurried. In Dynamic mode, the engine gets that bit more aggressive than it is in Comfort. Drive Select alters only engine and steering responses.

Road manners

No more air suspension; you get steel springs, like the other contenders. Ground clearance is sufficient and it manages to smother most road imperfections. The suspension have been well-calibrated, but at high speeds, it does float about a bit. However, the A6 still maintains good composure. Ride quality is one of the new A6’s strengths and the tall-profile tyres soak in the sharp bits well. The variable-ratio steering is quick in terms of response, but is far from being direct and precise. Also, grab the latest info on the new cars, only at autoX.